Cigars Typeface

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Cigars
In the chronology of Heavyweight’s work, the Cigars font is one of the first attempts at a serif font, undertaken in spite of fear of its difficulty; however, the challenge was also seen as an important step in the development of the type foundry. The name refers to admiration of old advertising materials of the Marlboro tobacco brand that used the very popular Century typeface from American Type Founders on its posters. Most of Heavyweight’s fonts are created for a specific purpose, with a clear vision of its use in a specific project and its graphic works based on the particular alphabets. It was the same for Cigars, which was created on the occasion of the international conference “Artistic Research: Is There Some Method?” at the Institute of Philosophy of the Czech Academy of Sciences. Custom-designed fonts are expected to respond to contemporary technological as well as cultural tendencies. Several years after the conference, work was recommenced on an altered version of the Cigars typeface, version 2.0, with an ambition to create an extensive typeface with italics. Its development was attended by the usual indecision and great respect for this font category, supported by the dilemma as to the degree to which the original spirit of a custom-designed typeface should be retained and what should be replaced to make the font more versatile. This was naturally combined with the author’s personality and style, which we like to reflect in a font. In response to this question, we made the fundamental decision to elaborate an extensive range of styles of the typeface, which inevitably altered the nature of the typeface. The original properties of the typeface were so distinct that they could no longer be applied in thicker weights. A fundamental advantage and property of the current version as compared to the original is legibility and harmony, which naturally changes depending on the choice of thickness that alters the character of a font. A pronounced feature of the font style is its calligraphic nature, which is only manifest in details, not in design. A reference to calligraphic tools is evident particularly in letters “c”, “f”, “r” and others, where the letter does not end with a classic terminal, but rather, a perpendicular cut.
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Cigars

U.S. Department
of Health and Human
Services.

Centers for Control and Prevention

Office for
Smoking or Non-smoking,
2014
[accessed 2016 Oct 18].

Journal of
Adolescent Health
2013; 541:40–6

[accessed 2015 Oct 13].

Cigars

Cigars Extra Light 19/23

Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco. Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco.

Cigars Regular 19/23

Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco. Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco.

Cigars Semi Bold 19/23

Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco. Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco.

Cigars Extra Bold 19/23

Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco. Of the smoke-ables, the cigar is arguably the most luxurious. Over the years, the elegantly rolled stogie has been treated to the same type of status we generally reserve for items like fine wine and truffles. And for good reason, as the best of the bunch tend to reflect nuance and a place of origin, and outfit the smoker with an experience unlike any other. But that’s not to say it’s the easiest hobby to stroll right into. In fact, cigars — like vintage Champagne, sailing, or cooking a lobster — can be a little intimidating. We’re here to quell that sensation and get you on the right track, cigar in hand. If anything, the cigar is a more respected figure than ever these days. We’re inundated with all kinds of things to inhale, from e-cigarettes to CBG joints. Meanwhile, the cigar has simply carried on, relying on distinctive tobacco and blends thereof to offer a real, tangible smoking experience without any related high. Really, it’s about the flavor and, while we acknowledge the health concerns, the look. There’s something sexy about a person in custody of a cigar, especially if they know what they’re doing. Before you start, we highly recommend you check out our comprehensive guide to cigar types. It’ll give you the lowdown on types of cigars you’re likely to encounter, as well as a better idea of what type you might enjoy. On an even more basic level, you can learn more about the difference between mild, medium, and bold cigars. Essentially, look for a cigar like you might a coveted piece of produce. In most cases, it ought to have integrity (firm throughout) and no blemishes. A great way to get going is talk up the person behind the counter at your local cigar shop. There, you’ll not only be treated to a crash course should you ask for one, but you’ll likely be able to take a few options out of the case and smell for yourself. This is the best way to see what your cigar palate is really after. Here are the main types: Robusto: Quite common, the Robusto is the workhorse, burning 30-45 minutes and creating a pretty high level of smoke. This is the most popular cigar on the market. Belicoso: Short and set up with a spire-like tip, the Belicoso tends to be a bit shorter and more tapered. Torpedo-esque in terms of shape, these cigars tend to offer a bit more concentration in terms of flavor and aromatics. Corona: Another iconic cigar build, the Corona are considered to be some of the most approachable, with good concentration and a length of up to about six inches. Lonsdale: This cigar type tends to burn a bit longer, which is no surprise given that it tends to be a bit longer in makeup. The draw, or act of taking in the cigar while it burns, is believed to be one of the most graceful with the Lonsdale. Panetela: Thin and long, the Panetela offers a pronounced element of refinement. Because of the smaller diameter, the flavors tend to revolve a bit more around the wrapper leaf, without overpowering the tobacco.

Cigars Regular 150/200

Robusto

Cigars Light 150/200

Belicoso

Cigars Extra Light 150/200

Lonsdale

Cigars Thin 150/200

Churchill

Cigars Regular 40/45

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Cigars Regular 19/23

Despite what you might have heard, cigar smoking isn't safer than cigarette smoking — even if you don't intentionally inhale the smoke. Like cigarette smoking, cigar smoking exposes you to: Nicotine. Cigars, like cigarettes, contain nicotine, the substance that can lead to tobacco dependence. A single full-size cigar can contain nearly as much nicotine as does a pack of cigarettes. If you inhale cigar smoke, you can get as much nicotine as if you smoked cigarettes. And even if you don't intentionally inhale, large amounts of nicotine can be absorbed through the lining of your mouth. Smoking cigars instead of cigarettes doesn't reduce your risk of nicotine dependence. Secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke from cigars contains the same toxic chemicals that secondhand cigarette smoke does. This type of smoke can cause or contribute to lung cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk and severity of childhood asthma, ear infections, and upper and lower respiratory infections in children. Cigar smoking poses serious health risks, including: All tobacco smoke contains chemicals that can cause cancer, and cigar smoke is no exception. Regular cigar smoking increases the risk of several types of cancers, including cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus and larynx. Lung and heart disease. Regular cigar smoking increases the risk of lung diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It might also increase the risk of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease. Oral disease. Cigar smoking has been linked to oral and dental disease, such as gum disease and tooth loss. Switching from cigarette smoking to cigar smoking can be particularly harmful because you might inhale cigar smoke the way you inhaled cigarette smoke. The more cigars you smoke and the deeper you inhale, the greater the risks. Although the health effects of occasional cigar smoking aren't as clear, the only safe level of cigar smoking is none at all. Instead of trying to choose between cigarette smoking and cigar smoking, try to quit tobacco entirely. There is no safe form of tobacco. A cigar is defined as a roll of tobacco wrapped in leaf tobacco or in a substance that contains tobacco. Cigars differ from cigarettes in that cigarettes are a roll of tobacco wrapped in paper or in a substance that does not contain tobacco. The three major types of cigars sold in the United States are large cigars, cigarillos, and little cigars. The use of flavorings in some cigar brands and the fact that they are commonly sold as a single stick has raised concerns that these products may be especially appealing to youth. In 2018, among middle and high school students who used cigars in the past 30 days, 43.6% reported using a flavored cigar during that time. Little cigars are the same size and shape as cigarettes, often include a filter, and are packaged in a similar way, but they are taxed differently than cigarettes. Rather than reduce consumption, cost-conscious smokers might switch from cigarettes to less costly little cigars. Historically, cigar smoking in the United States has been a behavior of older men, but the industry’s increased marketing of these products to targeted groups in the 1990s increased the prevalence of use among adolescents. Cigar use is higher among youth who use other tobacco products or other drugs (e.g., alcohol, marijuana, and inhalants) than among youth who do not use these products.

Cigars Semi Bold 40/45

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Cigars Semi Bold 19/23

Despite what you might have heard, cigar smoking isn't safer than cigarette smoking — even if you don't intentionally inhale the smoke. Like cigarette smoking, cigar smoking exposes you to: Nicotine. Cigars, like cigarettes, contain nicotine, the substance that can lead to tobacco dependence. A single full-size cigar can contain nearly as much nicotine as does a pack of cigarettes. If you inhale cigar smoke, you can get as much nicotine as if you smoked cigarettes. And even if you don't intentionally inhale, large amounts of nicotine can be absorbed through the lining of your mouth. Smoking cigars instead of cigarettes doesn't reduce your risk of nicotine dependence. Secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke from cigars contains the same toxic chemicals that secondhand cigarette smoke does. This type of smoke can cause or contribute to lung cancer and heart disease. It also increases the risk and severity of childhood asthma, ear infections, and upper and lower respiratory infections in children. Cigar smoking poses serious health risks, including: All tobacco smoke contains chemicals that can cause cancer, and cigar smoke is no exception. Regular cigar smoking increases the risk of several types of cancers, including cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus and larynx. Lung and heart disease. Regular cigar smoking increases the risk of lung diseases, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis. It might also increase the risk of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease. Oral disease. Cigar smoking has been linked to oral and dental disease, such as gum disease and tooth loss. Switching from cigarette smoking to cigar smoking can be particularly harmful because you might inhale cigar smoke the way you inhaled cigarette smoke. The more cigars you smoke and the deeper you inhale, the greater the risks. Although the health effects of occasional cigar smoking aren't as clear, the only safe level of cigar smoking is none at all. Instead of trying to choose between cigarette smoking and cigar smoking, try to quit tobacco entirely. There is no safe form of tobacco. A cigar is defined as a roll of tobacco wrapped in leaf tobacco or in a substance that contains tobacco. Cigars differ from cigarettes in that cigarettes are a roll of tobacco wrapped in paper or in a substance that does not contain tobacco. The three major types of cigars sold in the United States are large cigars, cigarillos, and little cigars. The use of flavorings in some cigar brands and the fact that they are commonly sold as a single stick has raised concerns that these products may be especially appealing to youth. In 2018, among middle and high school students who used cigars in the past 30 days, 43.6% reported using a flavored cigar during that time. Little cigars are the same size and shape as cigarettes, often include a filter, and are packaged in a similar way, but they are taxed differently than cigarettes. Rather than reduce consumption, cost-conscious smokers might switch from cigarettes to less costly little cigars. Historically, cigar smoking in the United States has been a behavior of older men, but the industry’s increased marketing of these products to targeted groups in the 1990s increased the prevalence of use among adolescents. Cigar use is higher among youth who use other tobacco products or other drugs (e.g., alcohol, marijuana, and inhalants) than among youth who do not use these products.

Cigars Extra Light 60/64

Terroristen
Grufulle
Sengetid
Kvartalet
Uventet
Scenen
Motbydelig
Staven
Lavaen
Underskrift
Solen
Preken
Bunns
Katte
Førerkortet
Verdien
Betatt
Strategien
Kongo
Protestere
Avgjørende
Skuta
Portalen
redager
Fører
Definisjon
Stedene
Pesten
Respekt
Velter
Pilotene
Navnløs
Milliard
Gisler
Plaprer
Episode
Impulsiv
Lovløs
Forsto
Problemet
Skrive
Demokrat
Laboratoriet
Forgjeves
Forstyrre
Bevises
Drukner
Trikset
Hjelp
Hektar

Cigars Medium 60/64

Protestere
Avgjørende
Skuta
Portalen
redager
Fører
Definisjon
Stedene
Pesten
Respekt
Velter
Pilotene
Navnløs
Milliard
Gisler
Plaprer
Episode
Impulsiv
Lovløs
Forsto
Problemet
Skrive
Demokrat
Laboratoriet
Forgjeves
Forstyrre
Bevises
Drukner
Trikset
Hjelp
Hektar

Cigars Black 60/64

Offer
Tilegnet
Regjere
Forberedelsene
Opphold
Nakken
Lokalt
Forretningene
Oppdratt
Gamla
Uorden
Tegning
Sjokkerende
Innsjøen
Gartneren
Fjernes
Avgjørelse
Områdene
Farget
Langsomme
Nøkkelen
Ubarmhjertig
Balkongen
Interessen
Skilpadde
Regnes
Låner
Spredd
Charles
Sparket
Uforberedt
Egner
Småtteri
Rengjort
Allan
Filmstjerne
Årlig
Amanda
Tempo
Framme
Kirurgisk
Utrette
Legehjelp
Enestående
Neger
Gladiator
Regissøren

Cigars

Character overview

Uppercase (26 Glyphs)
  • 0041
    A
  • 0042
    B
  • 0043
    C
  • 0044
    D
  • 0045
    E
  • 0046
    F
  • 0047
    G
  • 0048
    H
  • 0049
    I
  • 004A
    J
  • 004B
    K
  • 004C
    L
  • 004D
    M
  • 004E
    N
  • 004F
    O
  • 0050
    P
  • 0051
    Q
  • 0052
    R
  • 0053
    S
  • 0054
    T
  • 0055
    U
  • 0056
    V
  • 0057
    W
  • 0058
    X
  • 0059
    Y
  • 005A
    Z
Lowercase (26 Glyphs)
  • 0061
    a
  • 0062
    b
  • 0063
    c
  • 0064
    d
  • 0065
    e
  • 0066
    f
  • 0067
    g
  • 0068
    h
  • 0069
    i
  • 006A
    j
  • 006B
    k
  • 006C
    l
  • 006D
    m
  • 006E
    n
  • 006F
    o
  • 0070
    p
  • 0071
    q
  • 0072
    r
  • 0073
    s
  • 0074
    t
  • 0075
    u
  • 0076
    v
  • 0077
    w
  • 0078
    x
  • 0079
    y
  • 007A
    z
Accents Uppercase (166 Glyphs)
  • 00C1
    Á
  • 0102
    Ă
  • 00C2
    Â
  • 00C4
    Ä
  • 00C0
    À
  • 0100
    Ā
  • 0104
    Ą
  • 00C5
    Å
  • 00C3
    Ã
  • 01FA
    Ǻ
  • 01CD
    Ǎ
  • 0200
    Ȁ
  • 0226
    Ȧ
  • 1EA0
  • 0202
    Ȃ
  • 00C6
    Æ
  • 01FC
    Ǽ
  • 01E2
    Ǣ
  • 1E02
  • 0106
    Ć
  • 010C
    Č
  • 00C7
    Ç
  • 0108
    Ĉ
  • 010A
    Ċ
  • 010E
    Ď
  • 0110
    Đ
  • 00D0
    Ð
  • 1E10
  • 1E0A
  • 1E0C
  • 1E0E
  • 01C4
    DŽ
  • 01C5
    Dž
  • 00C9
    É
  • 0114
    Ĕ
  • 011A
    Ě
  • 00CA
    Ê
  • 00CB
    Ë
  • 0116
    Ė
  • 00C8
    È
  • 0112
    Ē
  • 0118
    Ę
  • 0204
    Ȅ
  • 1EB8
  • 1EBC
  • 0190
    Ɛ
  • 018F
    Ə
  • 1E1E
  • 011E
    Ğ
  • 011C
    Ĝ
  • 0122
    Ģ
  • 0120
    Ġ
  • 01E6
    Ǧ
  • 1E20
  • 0126
    Ħ
  • 0124
    Ĥ
  • 1E2A
  • 021E
    Ȟ
  • 1E22
  • 1E24
  • 00CD
    Í
  • 012C
    Ĭ
  • 00CE
    Î
  • 00CF
    Ï
  • 0130
    İ
  • 00CC
    Ì
  • 012A
    Ī
  • 012E
    Į
  • 0128
    Ĩ
  • 01CF
    Ǐ
  • 0208
    Ȉ
  • 1ECA
  • 0197
    Ɨ
  • 0132
    IJ
  • 0134
    Ĵ
  • 0136
    Ķ
  • 01E8
    Ǩ
  • 0139
    Ĺ
  • 013D
    Ľ
  • 013B
    Ļ
  • 013F
    Ŀ
  • 1E36
  • 0141
    Ł
  • 1E3E
  • 1E40
  • 1E42
  • 0143
    Ń
  • 0147
    Ň
  • 0145
    Ņ
  • 00D1
    Ñ
  • 1E44
  • 1E46
  • 01F8
    Ǹ
  • 019D
    Ɲ
  • 1E48
  • 014A
    Ŋ
  • 00D3
    Ó
  • 014E
    Ŏ
  • 00D4
    Ô
  • 00D6
    Ö
  • 00D2
    Ò
  • 0150
    Ő
  • 014C
    Ō
  • 00D5
    Õ
  • 01D1
    Ǒ
  • 020C
    Ȍ
  • 1ECC
  • 022E
    Ȯ
  • 01EA
    Ǫ
  • 00D8
    Ø
  • 01FE
    Ǿ
  • 0152
    Œ
  • 1E56
  • 00DE
    Þ
  • 0154
    Ŕ
  • 0158
    Ř
  • 0156
    Ŗ
  • 0210
    Ȑ
  • 1E5A
  • 1E5C
  • 1E5E
  • 015A
    Ś
  • 0160
    Š
  • 015C
    Ŝ
  • 015E
    Ş
  • 0218
    Ș
  • 1E60
  • 1E62
  • 1E9E
  • 00DF
    ß
  • 0166
    Ŧ
  • 0164
    Ť
  • 0162
    Ţ
  • 021A
    Ț
  • 1E6A
  • 1E6C
  • 00DA
    Ú
  • 016C
    Ŭ
  • 00DB
    Û
  • 00DC
    Ü
  • 0170
    Ű
  • 00D9
    Ù
  • 016A
    Ū
  • 0172
    Ų
  • 016E
    Ů
  • 0168
    Ũ
  • 01D3
    Ǔ
  • 0214
    Ȕ
  • 1EE4
  • 0244
    Ʉ
  • 1E7C
  • 0194
    Ɣ
  • 1E82
  • 0174
    Ŵ
  • 1E84
  • 1E80
  • 00DD
    Ý
  • 0176
    Ŷ
  • 0178
    Ÿ
  • 1EF2
  • 0232
    Ȳ
  • 1EF8
  • 0179
    Ź
  • 017D
    Ž
  • 017B
    Ż
  • 1E92
Accents Lowercase (170 Glyphs)
  • 00E1
    á
  • 0103
    ă
  • 00E2
    â
  • 00E4
    ä
  • 00E0
    à
  • 0101
    ā
  • 0105
    ą
  • 00E5
    å
  • 00E3
    ã
  • 01FB
    ǻ
  • 01CE
    ǎ
  • 0201
    ȁ
  • 0227
    ȧ
  • 1EA1
  • 0203
    ȃ
  • 00E6
    æ
  • 01FD
    ǽ
  • 01E3
    ǣ
  • 1E03
  • 0107
    ć
  • 010D
    č
  • 00E7
    ç
  • 0109
    ĉ
  • 010B
    ċ
  • 010F
    ď
  • 1E11
  • 1E0B
  • 1E0D
  • 0111
    đ
  • 1E0F
  • 00F0
    ð
  • 01C6
    dž
  • 00E9
    é
  • 0115
    ĕ
  • 011B
    ě
  • 00EA
    ê
  • 00EB
    ë
  • 0117
    ė
  • 00E8
    è
  • 0113
    ē
  • 1EBD
  • 0119
    ę
  • 0205
    ȅ
  • 1EB9
  • 025B
    ɛ
  • 0258
    ɘ
  • 0259
    ə
  • 01DD
    ǝ
  • 1E1F
  • 011F
    ğ
  • 011D
    ĝ
  • 0123
    ģ
  • 0121
    ġ
  • 01E7
    ǧ
  • 1E21
  • 0263
    ɣ
  • 0127
    ħ
  • 0125
    ĥ
  • 1E2B
  • 021F
    ȟ
  • 1E23
  • 1E25
  • 00ED
    í
  • 012D
    ĭ
  • 00EE
    î
  • 00EF
    ï
  • 00EC
    ì
  • 012B
    ī
  • 012F
    į
  • 0129
    ĩ
  • 0131
    ı
  • 01D0
    ǐ
  • 0209
    ȉ
  • 1ECB
  • 0268
    ɨ
  • 0133
    ij
  • 0135
    ĵ
  • 0237
    ȷ
  • 0137
    ķ
  • 01E9
    ǩ
  • 03BA
    κ
  • 013A
    ĺ
  • 013E
    ľ
  • 013C
    ļ
  • 0140
    ŀ
  • 1E37
  • 0142
    ł
  • 1E3F
    ḿ
  • 1E41
  • 1E43
  • 0144
    ń
  • 0148
    ň
  • 0146
    ņ
  • 0149
    ʼn
  • 00F1
    ñ
  • 1E45
  • 1E47
  • 01F9
    ǹ
  • 0272
    ɲ
  • 1E49
  • 014B
    ŋ
  • 00F3
    ó
  • 014F
    ŏ
  • 00F4
    ô
  • 00F6
    ö
  • 00F2
    ò
  • 0151
    ő
  • 014D
    ō
  • 00F5
    õ
  • 01D2
    ǒ
  • 020D
    ȍ
  • 1ECD
  • 022F
    ȯ
  • 01EB
    ǫ
  • 00F8
    ø
  • 01FF
    ǿ
  • 0153
    œ
  • 1E57
  • 00FE
    þ
  • 0155
    ŕ
  • 0159
    ř
  • 0157
    ŗ
  • 0211
    ȑ
  • 1E5B
  • 1E5D
  • 1E5F
  • 015B
    ś
  • 0161
    š
  • 015D
    ŝ
  • 015F
    ş
  • 0219
    ș
  • 1E61
  • 1E63
  • 00DF
    ß
  • 017F
    ſ
  • 0167
    ŧ
  • 0165
    ť
  • 0163
    ţ
  • 021B
    ț
  • 1E6B
  • 1E6D
  • 00FA
    ú
  • 016D
    ŭ
  • 00FB
    û
  • 00FC
    ü
  • 0171
    ű
  • 00F9
    ù
  • 016B
    ū
  • 0173
    ų
  • 016F
    ů
  • 0169
    ũ
  • 01D4
    ǔ
  • 0215
    ȕ
  • 1EE5
  • 0289
    ʉ
  • 1E7D
  • 1E83
  • 0175
    ŵ
  • 1E85
  • 1E81
  • 00FD
    ý
  • 0177
    ŷ
  • 00FF
    ÿ
  • 1EF3
  • 0233
    ȳ
  • 1EF9
  • 017A
    ź
  • 017E
    ž
  • 017C
    ż
  • 1E93
Lowercase Stylistic Set 01 (1 Glyphs)
  • 0072
    r
Ligatures (11 Glyphs)
  • 0133
    ij
  • fb
  • ff
  • ffb
  • ffh
  • ffi
  • ffl
  • fi
  • fj
  • fk
  • fl
Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Tabular Lining Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Case Sensitive Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Oldstyle Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Tabular Oldstyle Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Slashed Zero (3 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0030
    0
  • 0030
    0
Roman Figures (16 Glyphs)
  • 2160
  • 2161
  • 2162
  • 2163
  • 2164
  • 2165
  • 2166
  • 2167
  • 2168
  • 2169
  • 216A
  • 216B
  • 216C
  • 216D
  • 216E
  • 216F
Math (29 Glyphs)
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 00D7
    ×
  • 00F7
    ÷
  • 003D
    =
  • 2260
  • 003E
    >
  • 003C
    <
  • 2265
  • 2264
  • 00B1
    ±
  • 2248
  • 007E
    ~
  • 00AC
    ¬
  • 005E
    ^
  • 221E
  • 2205
  • 222B
  • 2211
  • 0394
    Δ
  • 03A9
    Ω
  • 220F
  • 03C0
    π
  • 03BC
    μ
  • 221A
  • 2202
  • 0023
    #
  • 0025
    %
  • 2030
Tabular Lining Math (16 Glyphs)
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 00D7
    ×
  • 00F7
    ÷
  • 003D
    =
  • 2260
  • 003E
    >
  • 003C
    <
  • 2265
  • 2264
  • 00B1
    ±
  • 2248
  • 007E
    ~
  • 00AC
    ¬
  • 0023
    #
  • 0025
    %
Case Sensitive Math (14 Glyphs)
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 00D7
    ×
  • 00F7
    ÷
  • 003D
    =
  • 2260
  • 003E
    >
  • 003C
    <
  • 2265
  • 2264
  • 00B1
    ±
  • 2248
  • 007E
    ~
  • 00AC
    ¬
Superscript & Subscript (26 Glyphs)
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 003D
    =
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 003D
    =
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Numerators & Denominator (20 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Ordinals (2 Glyphs)
  • 00AA
    ª
  • 00BA
    º
Currency (12 Glyphs)
  • 00A4
    ¤
  • 00A2
    ¢
  • 20B5
  • 20AC
  • 0024
    $
  • 00A3
    £
  • 20AA
  • 0192
    ƒ
  • 20BF
  • 20BD
  • 00A5
    ¥
  • 0E3F
    ฿
Fraction (9 Glyphs)
  • 2044
  • 215F
  • 00BD
    ½
  • 00BC
    ¼
  • 215B
  • 215C
  • 00BE
    ¾
  • 215D
  • 215E
Punctuation (48 Glyphs)
  • 002E
    .
  • 002C
    ,
  • 003A
    :
  • 003B
    ;
  • 2025
  • 2026
  • 0021
    !
  • 203C
  • 003F
    ?
  • 203D
  • 2E2E
  • 00A1
    ¡
  • 00BF
    ¿
  • 2E18
  • 002F
    /
  • 005C
    \
  • 005F
    _
  • 2017
  • 002D
    -
  • 00AD
    ­
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 00B7
    ·
  • 2022
  • 2023
  • 0028
    (
  • 0029
    )
  • 005B
    [
  • 005D
    ]
  • 007B
    {
  • 007D
    }
  • 00AB
    «
  • 00BB
    »
  • 2039
  • 203A
  • 0022
    "
  • 0027
    '
  • 2033
  • 2032
  • 201E
  • 201C
  • 201D
  • 201A
  • 2018
  • 2019
  • 002A
    *
  • 2051
  • 2042
Punctuation Case Sensitive Forms (20 Glyphs)
  • 2033
  • 2032
  • 00A1
    ¡
  • 00BF
    ¿
  • 2E18
  • 002D
    -
  • 00AD
    ­
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 2023
  • 0028
    (
  • 0029
    )
  • 005B
    [
  • 005D
    ]
  • 007B
    {
  • 007D
    }
  • 00AB
    «
  • 00BB
    »
  • 2039
  • 203A
Arrows (20 Glyphs)
  • 27F5
  • 27F6
  • 2190
  • 2192
  • 2194
  • 2191
  • 2193
  • 2195
  • 2197
  • 2196
  • 2198
  • 2199
  • 21A9
  • 21B0
  • 21B1
  • 21B2
  • 21B3
  • 21BA
  • 21BB
  • 21C6
Case Sensitive Arrows (12 Glyphs)
  • 27F5
  • 2191
  • 2197
  • 2192
  • 2198
  • 2193
  • 2199
  • 2190
  • 2196
  • 2194
  • 2195
Other (53 Glyphs)
  • 25E6
  • 25CA
  • 25CF
  • 25A0
  • 25B2
  • 25BC
  • 25BA
  • 25C4
  • 25CB
  • 25A1
  • 25B3
  • 0040
    @
  • 0040
    @
  • 0026
    &
  • 00A7
    §
  • 2116
  • 2116
  • 00B0
    °
  • 2020
  • 2021
  • 00A9
    ©
  • 00AE
    ®
  • 00AE
    ®
  • 2117
  • 2122
  • 2120
  • 00B6
  • 007C
    |
  • 00A6
    ¦
  • 2713
  • 2715
  • 1F10C
    🄌
  • 278A
  • 278B
  • 278C
  • 278D
  • 278E
  • 278F
  • 2790
  • 2791
  • 2792
  • 1F10B
    🄋
  • 2780
  • 2781
  • 2782
  • 2783
  • 2784
  • 2785
  • 2786
  • 2787
  • 2788
  • 2022
  • 25E6
Cigars

About

  • Number of glyphs: 806
  • Number of weights: 9
  • Number of languages: 219
  • Available: desktop, web, social, app, epub
  • Designer: Jan Horcik
  • Date of release: 2021
  • Version: 3.009

Character Set

  • Basic Latin
  • Latin-1 Supplement
  • Latin Extended-A
  • Latin Extended-B
  • Combining Diacritical Marks
  • Latin Extended Additional
  • General Punctuation
  • Currency Symbols
  • Number Forms
  • Enclosed Alphanumerics
  • Dingbats

Features

  • Access All Alternates
  • Glyph Composition/Decomposition
  • Localized Forms
  • Subscript
  • Scientific Inferiors
  • Superscript
  • Numerator
  • Denominator
  • Fractions
  • Ordinals
  • Lining Figures
  • Proportional Figures
  • Tabular Figures
  • Oldstyle Figures
  • Capitals to Small Caps
  • Small Caps
  • Case Sensitive Forms
  • Discretionary Ligatures
  • Slashed Zero
  • Capital Spacing
  • Stylistic Alternates
  • Stylistic Set 1

Languages

  • Abenaki
  • Afaan Oromo
  • Afar
  • Afrikaans
  • Albanian
  • Alsatian
  • Amis
  • Anuta
  • Aragonese
  • Aranese
  • Aromanian
  • Arrernte
  • Arvanitic (Latin)
  • Asturian
  • Atayal
  • Aymara
  • Azerbaijani
  • Bashkir (Latin)
  • Basque
  • Belarusian (Latin)
  • Bemba
  • Bikol
  • Bislama
  • Bosnian
  • Breton
  • Cape Verdean Creole
  • Catalan
  • Cebuano
  • Chamorro
  • Chavacano
  • Chichewa
  • Chickasaw
  • Cimbrian
  • Cofán
  • Cornish
  • Corsican
  • Creek
  • Crimean Tatar (Latin)
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Dawan
  • Delaware
  • Dholuo
  • Drehu
  • Dutch
  • English
  • Esperanto
  • Estonian
  • Faroese
  • Fijian
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • Folkspraak
  • French
  • Frisian
  • Friulian
  • Gagauz (Latin)
  • Galician
  • Ganda
  • Genoese
  • German
  • Gikuyu
  • Gooniyandi
  • Greenlandic (Kalaallisut)
  • Guadeloupean Creole
  • Gwich’in
  • Haitian Creole
  • Hän
  • Hawaiian
  • Hiligaynon
  • Hopi
  • Hotcąk (Latin)
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Ido
  • Igbo
  • Ilocano
  • Indonesian
  • Interglossa
  • Interlingua
  • Irish
  • Istro-Romanian
  • Italian
  • Jamaican
  • Javanese (Latin)
  • Jèrriais
  • Kaingang
  • Kala Lagaw Ya
  • Kapampangan (Latin)
  • Kaqchikel
  • Karakalpak (Latin)
  • Karelian (Latin)
  • Kashubian
  • Kikongo
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Kiribati
  • Kirundi
  • Klingon
  • Kurdish (Latin)
  • Ladin
  • Latin
  • Latino sine Flexione
  • Latvian
  • Lithuanian
  • Lojban
  • Lombard
  • Low Saxon
  • Luxembourgish
  • Maasai
  • Makhuwa
  • Malay
  • Maltese
  • Manx
  • Māori
  • Marquesan
  • Megleno-Romanian
  • Meriam Mir
  • Mirandese
  • Mohawk
  • Moldovan
  • Montagnais
  • Montenegrin
  • Murrinh-Patha
  • Nagamese Creole
  • Nahuatl
  • Ndebele
  • Neapolitan
  • Ngiyambaa
  • Niuean
  • Noongar
  • Norwegian
  • Novial
  • Occidental
  • Occitan
  • Old Icelandic
  • Old Norse
  • Onĕipŏt
  • Oshiwambo
  • Ossetian (Latin)
  • Palauan
  • Papiamento
  • Piedmontese
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Potawatomi
  • Q’eqchi’
  • Quechua
  • Rarotongan
  • Romanian
  • Romansh
  • Rotokas
  • Sami (Inari Sami)
  • Sami (Lule Sami)
  • Sami (Northern Sami)
  • Sami (Southern Sami)
  • Samoan
  • Sango
  • Saramaccan
  • Sardinian
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Serbian (Latin)
  • Seri
  • Seychellois Creole
  • Shawnee
  • Shona
  • Sicilian
  • Silesian
  • Slovak
  • Slovenian
  • Slovio (Latin)
  • Somali
  • Sorbian (Lower Sorbian)
  • Sorbian (Upper Sorbian)
  • Sotho (Northern)
  • Sotho (Southern)
  • Spanish
  • Sranan
  • Sundanese (Latin)
  • Swahili
  • Swazi
  • Swedish
  • Tagalog
  • Tahitian
  • Tetum
  • Tok Pisin
  • Tokelauan
  • Tongan
  • Tshiluba
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • Tumbuka
  • Turkish
  • Turkmen (Latin)
  • Tuvaluan
  • Tzotzil
  • Uzbek (Latin)
  • Venetian
  • Vepsian
  • Volapük
  • Võro
  • Wallisian
  • Walloon
  • Waray-Waray
  • Warlpiri
  • Wayuu
  • Welsh
  • Wik-Mungkan
  • Wiradjuri
  • Wolof
  • Xavante
  • Xhosa
  • Yapese
  • Yindjibarndi
  • Zapotec
  • Zarma
  • Zazaki
  • Zulu
  • Zuni
  • Abenaki
  • Afaan Oromo
  • Afar
  • Afrikaans
  • Albanian
  • Alsatian
  • Amis
  • Anuta
  • Aragonese
  • Aranese
  • Aromanian
  • Arrernte
  • Arvanitic (Latin)
  • Asturian
  • Atayal
  • Aymara
  • Azerbaijani
  • Bashkir (Latin)
  • Basque
  • Belarusian (Latin)
  • Bemba
  • Bikol
  • Bislama
  • Bosnian
  • Breton
  • Cape Verdean Creole
  • Catalan
  • Cebuano
  • Chamorro
  • Chavacano
  • Chichewa
  • Chickasaw
  • Cimbrian
  • Cofán
  • Cornish
  • Corsican
  • Creek
  • Crimean Tatar (Latin)
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Dawan
  • Delaware
  • Dholuo
  • Drehu
  • Dutch
  • English
  • Esperanto
  • Estonian
  • Faroese
  • Fijian
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • Folkspraak
  • French
  • Frisian
  • Friulian
  • Gagauz (Latin)
  • Galician
  • Ganda
  • Genoese
  • German
  • Gikuyu
  • Gooniyandi
  • Greenlandic (Kalaallisut)
  • Guadeloupean Creole
  • Gwich’in
  • Haitian Creole
  • Hän
  • Hawaiian
  • Hiligaynon
  • Hopi
  • Hotcąk (Latin)
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Ido
  • Igbo
  • Ilocano
  • Indonesian
  • Interglossa
  • Interlingua
  • Irish
  • Istro-Romanian
  • Italian
  • Jamaican
  • Javanese (Latin)
  • Jèrriais
  • Kaingang
  • Kala Lagaw Ya
  • Kapampangan (Latin)
  • Kaqchikel
  • Karakalpak (Latin)
  • Karelian (Latin)
  • Kashubian
  • Kikongo
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Kiribati
  • Kirundi
  • Klingon
  • Kurdish (Latin)
  • Ladin
  • Latin
  • Latino sine Flexione
  • Latvian
  • Lithuanian
  • Lojban
  • Lombard
  • Low Saxon
  • Luxembourgish
  • Maasai
  • Makhuwa
  • Malay
  • Maltese
  • Manx
  • Māori
  • Marquesan
  • Megleno-Romanian
  • Meriam Mir
  • Mirandese
  • Mohawk
  • Moldovan
  • Montagnais
  • Montenegrin
  • Murrinh-Patha
  • Nagamese Creole
  • Nahuatl
  • Ndebele
  • Neapolitan
  • Ngiyambaa
  • Niuean
  • Noongar
  • Norwegian
  • Novial
  • Occidental
  • Occitan
  • Old Icelandic
  • Old Norse
  • Onĕipŏt
  • Oshiwambo
  • Ossetian (Latin)
  • Palauan
  • Papiamento
  • Piedmontese
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Potawatomi
  • Q’eqchi’
  • Quechua
  • Rarotongan
  • Romanian
  • Romansh
  • Rotokas
  • Sami (Inari Sami)
  • Sami (Lule Sami)
  • Sami (Northern Sami)
  • Sami (Southern Sami)
  • Samoan
  • Sango
  • Saramaccan
  • Sardinian
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Serbian (Latin)
  • Seri
  • Seychellois Creole
  • Shawnee
  • Shona
  • Sicilian
  • Silesian
  • Slovak
  • Slovenian
  • Slovio (Latin)
  • Somali
  • Sorbian (Lower Sorbian)
  • Sorbian (Upper Sorbian)
  • Sotho (Northern)
  • Sotho (Southern)
  • Spanish
  • Sranan
  • Sundanese (Latin)
  • Swahili
  • Swazi
  • Swedish
  • Tagalog
  • Tahitian
  • Tetum
  • Tok Pisin
  • Tokelauan
  • Tongan
  • Tshiluba
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • Tumbuka
  • Turkish
  • Turkmen (Latin)
  • Tuvaluan
  • Tzotzil
  • Uzbek (Latin)
  • Venetian
  • Vepsian
  • Volapük
  • Võro
  • Wallisian
  • Walloon
  • Waray-Waray
  • Warlpiri
  • Wayuu
  • Welsh
  • Wik-Mungkan
  • Wiradjuri
  • Wolof
  • Xavante
  • Xhosa
  • Yapese
  • Yindjibarndi
  • Zapotec
  • Zarma
  • Zazaki
  • Zulu
  • Zuni

Buying options

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Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

License Information

3rd Party Desktop

You will receive the license as a supplement to the Desktop License which allows you to share the font with your 3rd party companies, printers, freelancers or whoever else you need to edit something or work for you.

Broadcasting

You will receive the license to use the font within the television, cinema, video advertising, internet streaming, video clips & billboards, movie titling etc. The price is based on the location and the license duration.

Logos and Tag Lines

You will receive the license to use the font for your logos, taglines, branding slogans, catchphrases etc. This license allows to use the font even for animated versions of logos together with taglines etc.

Online Advertising

You will receive the license to use the font for your advertisement on website or mobile platforms, pop-ups and banners, html5 banners, hover ads, floating ads, email newsletters, digital signages, video advertising etc.

Merchandising

You will receive the license to use the font on the physical products for commercial or advertising merchandise such as for instance product packaging, clothing & shoes, sport accessories, objects made of letters etc.

Enterprise

You will receive the unlimited license for absolute adaptability. Package includes Desktop, Web, App, Social Media, ePub, 3rd Party Desktop, Broadcasting, Logo and Tag Lines, Online Advertising, Merchandising licenses.

Student

We offer the 50% discount for students for their non-commercial and commercial projects during their studies. To get the discount, please hit the button “Get in Touch”. Please do not forget to attach a certificate of study.

Nonprofit Organization

We also support educational programmes and non-profit organisations with the same 50% discount. To get the discount, please hit the button “Get in Touch” Please do not forget to attach a certificate of your non-profit organization.