Atlantic Typeface

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Atlantic
One of the goals since the establishment of Heavyweight has been to develop a diverse portfolio of fonts from different categories of type classification. The Atlantic font confirms the strategy: compared to other alphabets designed by Heavyweight, it does not come off as a type for variable use in universal applications. From the beginning, it is evident that it is a display type that stands out, particularly in details and in larger sizes. Strangely, the font is not based on a clear model and the inspiration behind it cannot be characterised firmly, although at times, admiration for the Optima type by Hermann Zapf is visible in places. The nature of the font reveals the desire to advance calligraphic drawing with a dose of geometry reminiscent of the letter “O” that defines the proportional features of the Atlantic font. The motivation for the style was not only a gap in the portfolio – as is typical for Heavyweight, the original purpose was a specific project linked to fashion design and jewellery. After all, first to be drawn was the thin style designed with care as a jewel. The style of work, refining of the hairline detail, clearly reminded of the work of jewellers. Since the start of work on Atlantic, the font has been classified as sans-serif – the notional serifs are replaced with broadening stems, advancing more or less depending on their thickness. The original plan was to keep only the one original style, but circumstances again called for an extension of the font family for uses in applications that require a stronger ductus of the letters. Iconic for this font are its proportions, the moderate x-Height and calligraphic design that is notable across the character set. Letters more pronounced are lowercase “e” and “c”, “f”, “g”, as well as lower and uppercase “o” and “O”, with a distinctly diagonal axis, again referring to a calligraphic tool. Circular letters that, at first sight, copy the “o”, such as “b”, “d”, “p”, “q”, and other geometric shapes, depart from that impression with increased thickness, taking on a more humanised form. Atlantic has appeared in the New York Magazine, a fashion supplement of the El País magazine, in M.A.C Cosmetics, and others.
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Atlantic

Journal of Geophysical Research

Coordinates: 
0°N 25°W

106,460,000 km2
Nautic Area

Atlantic

Atlantic Medium 120/130

Cape Hatteras
NOAA satellites
Rossby and Rago

Seasat & Geosat
(Hogg et al. 1986)
Gulf Stream '60

ABCE/SME 28
North Atlantic Current
Eddy kinetic energy

Hudson Bay
1.23 million
km2

Labrador Sea
841,000
km2

Bay of Campeche
16,000
km2

Libyan Sea
350,000
km2

Levantine Sea
320,000
km2

Tyrrhenian Sea
275,000
km2

Ionian Sea - 169,000 km2
Adriatic Sea - 138,000 km2
Gulf of Bothnia - 116,300 km2
Sea of Crete - 95,000 km2
Gulf of Maine - 93,000 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Ligurian Sea - 80,000 km2
English Channel - 75,000 km2
James Bay - 68,300 km2
Bothnian Sea - 66,000 km2
Gulf of Sidra - 57,000 km2
Sea of the Hebrides - 47,000 km2
Irish Sea - 46,000 km2
Sea of Azov - 39,000 km2
Bothnian Bay - 36,800 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Gulf of Lion - 15,000 km2
Sea of Marmara - 11,350 km2
Wadden Sea - 10,000 km2
Archipelago Sea - 8,300 km2

Atlantic Semi Bold 24/32

Sargasso Sea - 3.5 million km2
Black Sea - 436,000 km2
Gulf of Guinea - 2.35 million km2
Irminger Sea - 780,000 km2
Hudson Bay - 1.23 million km2
Labrador Sea - 841,000 km2
Baffin Bay - 689,000 km2
Bay of Campeche - 16,000 km2
North Sea - 575,000 km2
Libyan Sea - 350,000 km2
Levantine Sea - 320,000 km2
Celtic Sea - 300,000 km2
Tyrrhenian Sea - 275,000 km2
Ionian Sea - 169,000 km2
Adriatic Sea - 138,000 km2
Gulf of Bothnia - 116,300 km2
Sea of Crete - 95,000 km2
Gulf of Maine - 93,000 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Ligurian Sea - 80,000 km2
English Channel - 75,000 km2
James Bay - 68,300 km2
Bothnian Sea - 66,000 km2
Gulf of Sidra - 57,000 km2
Sea of the Hebrides - 47,000 km2
Irish Sea - 46,000 km2
Sea of Azov - 39,000 km2
Bothnian Bay - 36,800 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Gulf of Lion - 15,000 km2
Sea of Marmara - 11,350 km2
Wadden Sea - 10,000 km2
Archipelago Sea - 8,300 km2
Sargasso Sea - 3.5 million km2
Black Sea - 436,000 km2
Gulf of Guinea - 2.35 million km2
Irminger Sea - 780,000 km2
Hudson Bay - 1.23 million km2
Labrador Sea - 841,000 km2
Baffin Bay - 689,000 km2
Bay of Campeche - 16,000 km2
North Sea - 575,000 km2
Libyan Sea - 350,000 km2
Levantine Sea - 320,000 km2
Celtic Sea - 300,000 km2
Tyrrhenian Sea - 275,000 km2
Ionian Sea - 169,000 km2
Adriatic Sea - 138,000 km2
Gulf of Bothnia - 116,300 km2
Sea of Crete - 95,000 km2
Gulf of Maine - 93,000 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Ligurian Sea - 80,000 km2
English Channel - 75,000 km2
James Bay - 68,300 km2
Bothnian Sea - 66,000 km2
Gulf of Sidra - 57,000 km2
Sea of the Hebrides - 47,000 km2
Irish Sea - 46,000 km2
Sea of Azov - 39,000 km2
Bothnian Bay - 36,800 km2
Gulf of Venezuela - 17,840 km2
Gulf of Lion - 15,000 km2
Sea of Marmara - 11,350 km2
Wadden Sea - 10,000 km2
Archipelago Sea - 8,300 km2

Atlantic Bold 18/22

The oldest known mentions of an “Atlantic” sea come from Stesichorus around mid-sixth century BC (Sch. A. R. 1. 211):[7]. English: ‘the Atlantic sea’; etym. ‘Sea of Atlas’) and in The Histories of Herodotus around 450 BC (Hdt. 1.202.4): Atlantis thalassa where the name refers to “the sea beyond the pillars of Heracles” which is said to be part of the sea that surrounds all land [9] In these uses, the name refers to Atlas, the Titan in Greek mythology, who supported the heavens and who later appeared as a frontispiece in Medieval maps and also lent his name to modern atlases.[10] On the other hand, to early Greek sailors and in Ancient Greek mythological literature such as the Iliad and the Odyssey, this all-encompassing ocean was instead known as Oceanus, the gigantic river that encircled the world; in contrast to the enclosed seas well known to the Greeks: the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.[11] In contrast, the term “Atlantic” originally. referred specifically to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and the sea off the Strait of Gibraltar and the North African coast.[10] The Greek word thalassa has been reused by scientists for the. huge Panthalassa ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea hundreds of millions of years ago. The term “Aethiopian Ocean”, derived from Ancient Ethiopia, was applied to the Southern Atlantic as late as the mid-19th century.[12] During the Age of Discovery, the Atlantic was also known to English cartographers as the Great Western Ocean.[13] The pond is a term often used by. British and American speakers in reference to the Northern Atlantic Ocean, as a form of meiosis, or sarcastic understatement. It is used mostly when referring to events or circumstances “on this side of the pond” or “on the other side of the pond”, rather than to discuss the ocean itself.[14] The term dates to 1640, first appearing in print in pamphlet released during the reign of Charles I, and reproduced in 1869 in Nehemiah Wallington’s Historical Notices of Events Occurring Chiefly in The Reign of Charles I, where “great Pond” is used in reference to the Atlantic Ocean by Francis Windebank, Charles I’s Secretary of State.[15][16][17]. The oldest known mentions of an “Atlantic” sea come from Stesichorus around mid-sixth century BC (Sch. A. R. 1. 211):[7]. English: ‘the Atlantic sea’; etym. ‘Sea of Atlas’) and in The Histories of Herodotus around 450 BC (Hdt. 1.202.4): Atlantis thalassa where the name refers to “the sea beyond the pillars of Heracles” which is said to be part of the sea that surrounds all land [9] In these uses, the name refers to Atlas, the Titan in Greek mythology, who supported the heavens and who later appeared as a frontispiece in Medieval maps and also lent his name to modern atlases.[10] On the other hand, to early Greek sailors and in Ancient Greek mythological literature such as the Iliad and the Odyssey, this all-encompassing ocean was instead known as Oceanus, the gigantic river that encircled the world; in contrast to the enclosed seas well known to the Greeks: the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.[11] In contrast, the term “Atlantic” originally. referred specifically to the Atlas Mountains in Morocco and the sea off the Strait of Gibraltar and the North African coast.[10] The Greek word thalassa has been reused by scientists for the. huge Panthalassa ocean that surrounded the supercontinent Pangaea hundreds of millions of years ago. The term “Aethiopian Ocean”, derived from Ancient Ethiopia, was applied to the Southern Atlantic as late as the mid-19th century.[12] During the Age of Discovery, the Atlantic was also known to English cartographers as the Great Western Ocean.[13] The pond is a term often used by. British and American speakers in reference to the Northern Atlantic Ocean, as a form of meiosis, or sarcastic understatement. It is used mostly when referring to events or circumstances “on this side of the pond” or “on the other side of the pond”, rather than to discuss the ocean itself.[14] The term dates to 1640, first appearing in print in pamphlet released during the reign of Charles I, and reproduced in 1869 in Nehemiah Wallington’s Historical Notices of Events Occurring Chiefly in The Reign of Charles I, where “great Pond” is used in reference to the Atlantic Ocean by Francis Windebank, Charles I’s Secretary of State.[15][16][17]

Atlantic Thin 30/34

Scontare
Conosci
Tantino
Crollare
Apro
Valeva
Laureato
Astuta
Moquette
Pezzente
Riva
Prepararmi
Scatole
Stressato
Regole
Efficiente
Console
Grasso
Accade
Velenosa
Distrutto
Mancava
Ruolo
Vedrò
Smetterai
Trovarne
Muoiano
Omosessualità
Nominare
Carati
Mancheranno
Assoluzione
Buffoni
Lode
Manica
Zoccoli
Rupert
Pacchi
Collegato
Boh
Aspetterai
Pensavate
Sembrarti
Rettore
Salsiccia
Romantico
Sinfonia
Esilio
Estensione
Spingono
Roccia
Affare
Certificato
Esatte
Squali
Ebreo
Davi
Cambiarlo
Pover
Interessasse
Prete

Atlantic Light 30/34

Féroces
Moineau
Vallée
Stylo
Long
Relever
Tient
Dérive
Trouer
Commencerai
Trains
Inondations
Trempés
Chantant
Capricieux
Illumine
Marchandises
Pasteur
Ambulances
Fauteuils
Bêtise
Exploser
Pressez
Mesure
Galère
Consultation
Détruire
Précises
Projeter
Conférence
Fâchée
Conserver
Ogre
Raisonnement
Déshabille
Projeté
Vont
Médecine
Faveur
Villages
Empoisonnement
Hauts
Pyjamas
Accorde
Héritière
Accrocher
Tutelle
Bourse
Commençons
Paragraphe

Atlantic Medium 30/34

New-Found
Czarevitch
Docker
Understrapper
Rain-Wash
Denunciations
Tamers
Slip-Roads
Zonures
Gaspereau
Unsteels
Cobdenism
Stellated
Bedivere
Churchianity
Mordred
Shuddery
Pop-Gun
Intendancy
Toranas
Unauspicious
Kaid
Side-Doors
Muir-Poots
Ranula
Masticot
Fitters
Admins
Percheron
Ombrophobe
Sorbitises
Normalises
Archives
Snotties
Fluorometers
Mislay
X-Body
Upswings
Kink-Host
Sergeantcy
Homonym
Ono
Queans
Vanned
Nanning
Insensibleness
Semicylinders
Connotes
Compers
Cichoraceous
Locomoting
Tomtits
Craterous
Phoresis
Bacchanalian
Blusher
Resettlements
Platyrrhinian
Acmites
Slacker
Pyrosulphuric
Brisè
Flatulence
Rededicated
Hoorahed
Carcinogenicity
Priesting
Enteroliths
Singularized
Cruising
Vulvitis
Effleurages
Almoner
Red-Man
Confutable
Congressmen
Sourest
Horse-Faced
Thereaway
Apothecia
Fletches
Mambo
Telecontrols
End-Readers
Homeopathy

Atlantic Bold 30/34

Flød
Haglgevær
Opfordre
Aftaler
Skuespiller
Lufthavne
Allsubs
Dansegulvet
Privilegier
Staters
Skævøje
Tusindvis
Politikere
Ramona
Fæhoved
Kollega
Åbnes
Tilgav
Rækker
Kirke
Hedt
Stolen
Lolita
Gennemblødt
Ruinerne
Kyle
Etnisk
Hævede
Block
Omløb
Dusin
Førsteårs
Hanne
Råber
Vera
Læsere
Bøller
Pinden
Tossen
Women
Latterligt
Gerald
Gaius
Transportere
Råd
Fortrolig
Blodig

Atlantic Medium 50/60

North Atlantic:
41,490,000 km2 (16,020,000 sq mi),
7–8 °C (13–14 °F).

Atlantic Medium 26/30

The Gulf Stream transport varies not only in space, but also in time. According to Geosat altimetry results, the current transports a maximum amount of water in the fall and a minimum in the spring, in phase with the north-south shifts of the its position (Kelly and Gille 1990; Zlotnicki 1991; Kelly 1991; Hogg and Johns 1995). Rossby and Rago (1985) and Fu et al. (1987) obtained similar results when they looked at sea level differences across the Stream. All of these studies found that the Gulf Stream has a marked seasonal variability, with peak-to-peak amplitude in sea surface height of 10-15 cm. The fluctuation is mostly confined to the upper 200-300 m of the water column and is a result of seasonal heating and expansion of the surface waters (Hogg and Johns 1995). Height differences this small, if assumed to decay linearly to zero at 300 m, would only result in annual transport fluctuations of about 1.5 Sv (Hogg and Johns 1995). Interestingly, the variations in transport of the deep waters in the current appear to be almost opposite in phase to the surface waters, and their magnitude is more significant (Hogg and Johns 1995). As Worthington (1976) suggested, the maximum transport occurs in the spring, and the amplitude of the annual cycle is as large as 5-8.5 Sv (Manning and Watts 1989; Sato and Rossby 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). The mechanism Worthington proposed was extensive convection south of the Gulf Stream in winter due to the atmospheric cooling of surface waters. This causes the thermocline to deepen and the baroclinic transport to increase (Fu et al. 1987). Although his idea has been controversial, alternate hypotheses have not adequately explained observations (Hogg and Johns 1995). The Gulf Stream transport varies not only in space, but also in time. According to Geosat altimetry results, the current transports a maximum amount of water in the fall and a minimum in the spring, in phase with the north-south shifts of the its position (Kelly and Gille 1990; Zlotnicki 1991; Kelly 1991; Hogg and Johns 1995). Rossby and Rago (1985) and Fu et al. (1987) obtained similar results when they looked at sea level differences across the Stream. All of these studies found that the Gulf Stream has a marked seasonal variability, with peak-to-peak amplitude in sea surface height of 10-15 cm. The fluctuation is mostly confined to the upper 200-300 m of the water column and is a result of seasonal heating and expansion of the surface waters (Hogg and Johns 1995). Height differences this small, if assumed to decay linearly to zero at 300 m, would only result in annual transport fluctuations of about 1.5 Sv (Hogg and Johns 1995). Interestingly, the variations in transport of the deep waters in the current appear to be almost opposite in phase to the surface waters, and their magnitude is more significant (Hogg and Johns 1995). As Worthington (1976) suggested, the maximum transport occurs in the spring, and the amplitude of the annual cycle is as large as 5-8.5 Sv (Manning and Watts 1989; Sato and Rossby 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). The mechanism Worthington proposed was extensive convection south of the Gulf Stream in winter due to the atmospheric cooling of surface waters. This causes the thermocline to deepen and the baroclinic transport to increase (Fu et al. 1987). Although his idea has been controversial, alternate hypotheses have not adequately explained observations (Hogg and Johns 1995).

Atlantic Medium 26/30

Like transport, the meandering of the Gulf Stream intensifies downstream of Cape Hatteras, reaching a maximum near 65°W. Meanders often pinch off from the current to form Gulf Stream rings. On average, the Stream sheds 22 warm-core rings and 35 cold-core rings per year (Hogg and Johns 1995). Once it reaches the Grand Banks, the structure of the Gulf Stream changes from a single, meandering front to multiple, branching fronts (Krauss 1986; Johns et al. 1995). Early oceanographic papers on the North Atlantic (Iselin 1936; Fuglister 1951a, 1951b; Sverdrup et al. 1942) mention the branching, but due to sparse data in this area, the branch points were considered largely theoretical until confirmed by Mann (1967). Mann (1967) showed two branches at 38°30;N 44°W. One branch curves north along the continental slope, eventually turning east between 50° and 52°N. This branch is called the North Atlantic Current and was well known even in Iselin's time. The other branch flows southeastward towards the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is called the Azores Current. This southern branch is most likely synonymous with Iselin's "Atlantic Current" and was formally named the Azores Current in a paper by Gould (1985). The region of the Gulf Stream's branch point is highly dynamic and subject to rapid change. The high degree of mesoscale activity, along with rapid changes in the major surface currents, make this a very difficult region to study. Part of this variability arises from the high amount of eddy activity. Eddy kinetic energy along both the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Current is at peak values here (Richardson 1983). There is also the presence of elongated, high-pressure cells along the offshore side of the North Atlantic Current (Worthington 1976; Clarke et al. 1980; Baranov and Ginkul 1984; Krauss et al. 1987). These pressure cells may be linked to outbursts of Labrador Current water from the Grand Banks (Krauss et al. 1987) that lead to extensive mixing at the end of the Gulf Stream. Like transport, the meandering of the Gulf Stream intensifies downstream of Cape Hatteras, reaching a maximum near 65°W. Meanders often pinch off from the current to form Gulf Stream rings. On average, the Stream sheds 22 warm-core rings and 35 cold-core rings per year (Hogg and Johns 1995). Once it reaches the Grand Banks, the structure of the Gulf Stream changes from a single, meandering front to multiple, branching fronts (Krauss 1986; Johns et al. 1995). Early oceanographic papers on the North Atlantic (Iselin 1936; Fuglister 1951a, 1951b; Sverdrup et al. 1942) mention the branching, but due to sparse data in this area, the branch points were considered largely theoretical until confirmed by Mann (1967). Mann (1967) showed two branches at 38°30;N 44°W. One branch curves north along the continental slope, eventually turning east between 50° and 52°N. This branch is called the North Atlantic Current and was well known even in Iselin's time. The other branch flows southeastward towards the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and is called the Azores Current. This southern branch is most likely synonymous with Iselin's "Atlantic Current" and was formally named the Azores Current in a paper by Gould (1985). The region of the Gulf Stream's branch point is highly dynamic and subject to rapid change. The high degree of mesoscale activity, along with rapid changes in the major surface currents, make this a very difficult region to study. Part of this variability arises from the high amount of eddy activity. Eddy kinetic energy along both the Gulf Stream and the North Atlantic Current is at peak values here (Richardson 1983). There is also the presence of elongated, high-pressure cells along the offshore side of the North Atlantic Current (Worthington 1976; Clarke et al. 1980; Baranov and Ginkul 1984; Krauss et al. 1987). These pressure cells may be linked to outbursts of Labrador Current water from the Grand Banks (Krauss et al. 1987) that lead to extensive mixing at the end of the Gulf Stream.

Atlantic Medium 50/60

South Atlantic:
40,270,000 km2 (15,550,000 sq mi)
6–9 °C (12–18 °F)

Atlantic Extra Light 20/24

Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995).

Atlantic Light 20/24

Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995).

Atlantic Regular 20/24

Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995).

Atlantic Medium 20/24

Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995). Beginning in the Caribbean and ending in the northern North Atlantic, the Gulf Stream System is one of the world's most intensely studied current systems. This extensive western boundary current plays an important role in the poleward transfer of heat and salt and serves to warm the European subcontinent. Traditional hydrographic studies in this region include those of Iselin (1936) and Gulf Stream '60 (Fuglister 1963). The high degree of mesoscale activity associated with this system also has attracted oceanographers. Studies of these phenomena have focused on the "snapshot" representation of the region and have included studies such as SYNOP, Gusto, and ABCE/SME. The Gulf Stream system is powerful enough to be readily seen from space and was visible in even the earliest satellite altimetry studies, such as Seasat and later Geosat. Strong thermal gradients also made it visible to infrared measurements, like VHRR (Very High Resolution Radiometer) readings using the early NOAA satellites, THIR (Temperature and Humidity Infrared Radiometer) readings from Nimbus satellites, and Advanced VHRR (AVHRR) readings from later NOAA satellites. The Gulf Stream begins upstream of Cape Hatteras, where the Florida Current ceases to follow the continental shelf. The position of the Stream as it leaves the coast changes throughout the year. In the fall, it shifts north, while in the winter and early spring it shifts south (Auer 1987; Kelly and Gille 1990; Frankignoul et al. 2001). Compared with the width of the current (about 100-200 km), the range of this variation (30-40 km) is relatively small (Hogg and Johns 1995). However, recent studies by Mariano et al. (2002) suggests that the meridional range of the annual variation in stream path may be closer to 100 km. Other characteristics of the current are more variable. Significant changes in its transport, meandering, and structure can be observed through many time scales as it travels northeast. The transport of the Gulf Stream nearly doubles downstream of Cape Hatteras (Knauss 1969; Hall and Fofonoff 1993; Hendry 1988; Leaman et al. 1989) at a rate of 8 Sv every 100 km (Knauss 1969; Johns et al. 1995). It appears that the downstream increase in transport between Cape Hatteras and 55°W is mostly due to increased velocities in the deep waters of the Gulf Stream (Johns et al. 1995). This increase in velocity is thought to be associated with deep recirculation cells found north and south of the current (Hall and Fofonoff 1993). Examples of these recirculations include small recirculations east of the Bahamas (Olson et al. 1984; Lee et al. 1990), the Worthington Gyre south of the Gulf Stream between 55° and 75°W (Worthington 1976), and the Northern Recirculation Gyre north of the Gulf Stream (Hogg et al. 1986). Recent studies suggest that the recirculations steadily increase the transport in the Gulf Stream from 30 Sv in the Florida Current to a maximum of 150 Sv at 55°W (Hendry 1982; Hogg 1992; Hogg and Johns 1995).

Atlantic

Character overview

Uppercase (26 Glyphs)
  • 0041
    A
  • 0042
    B
  • 0043
    C
  • 0044
    D
  • 0045
    E
  • 0046
    F
  • 0047
    G
  • 0048
    H
  • 0049
    I
  • 004A
    J
  • 004B
    K
  • 004C
    L
  • 004D
    M
  • 004E
    N
  • 004F
    O
  • 0050
    P
  • 0051
    Q
  • 0052
    R
  • 0053
    S
  • 0054
    T
  • 0055
    U
  • 0056
    V
  • 0057
    W
  • 0058
    X
  • 0059
    Y
  • 005A
    Z
Lowercase (26 Glyphs)
  • 0061
    a
  • 0062
    b
  • 0063
    c
  • 0064
    d
  • 0065
    e
  • 0066
    f
  • 0067
    g
  • 0068
    h
  • 0069
    i
  • 006A
    j
  • 006B
    k
  • 006C
    l
  • 006D
    m
  • 006E
    n
  • 006F
    o
  • 0070
    p
  • 0071
    q
  • 0072
    r
  • 0073
    s
  • 0074
    t
  • 0075
    u
  • 0076
    v
  • 0077
    w
  • 0078
    x
  • 0079
    y
  • 007A
    z
Uppercase Accents (162 Glyphs)
  • 00C1
    Á
  • 0102
    Ă
  • 00C2
    Â
  • 00C4
    Ä
  • 00C0
    À
  • 0100
    Ā
  • 0104
    Ą
  • 00C5
    Å
  • 00C3
    Ã
  • 01FA
    Ǻ
  • 01CD
    Ǎ
  • 0200
    Ȁ
  • 0226
    Ȧ
  • 1EA0
  • 0202
    Ȃ
  • 00C6
    Æ
  • 01FC
    Ǽ
  • 01E2
    Ǣ
  • 1E02
  • 0106
    Ć
  • 010C
    Č
  • 00C7
    Ç
  • 0108
    Ĉ
  • 010A
    Ċ
  • 010E
    Ď
  • 0110
    Đ
  • 00D0
    Ð
  • 1E10
  • 1E0A
  • 1E0C
  • 1E0E
  • 01C4
    DŽ
  • 01C5
    Dž
  • 00C9
    É
  • 0114
    Ĕ
  • 011A
    Ě
  • 00CA
    Ê
  • 00CB
    Ë
  • 0116
    Ė
  • 00C8
    È
  • 0112
    Ē
  • 0118
    Ę
  • 0204
    Ȅ
  • 1EB8
  • 1EBC
  • 1E1E
  • 011E
    Ğ
  • 011C
    Ĝ
  • 0122
    Ģ
  • 0120
    Ġ
  • 01E6
    Ǧ
  • 1E20
  • 0126
    Ħ
  • 0124
    Ĥ
  • 1E2A
  • 021E
    Ȟ
  • 1E22
  • 1E24
  • 00CD
    Í
  • 012C
    Ĭ
  • 00CE
    Î
  • 00CF
    Ï
  • 0130
    İ
  • 00CC
    Ì
  • 012A
    Ī
  • 012E
    Į
  • 0128
    Ĩ
  • 01CF
    Ǐ
  • 0208
    Ȉ
  • 1ECA
  • 0197
    Ɨ
  • 0132
    IJ
  • 0134
    Ĵ
  • 0136
    Ķ
  • 01E8
    Ǩ
  • 0139
    Ĺ
  • 013D
    Ľ
  • 013B
    Ļ
  • 013F
    Ŀ
  • 1E36
  • 0141
    Ł
  • 1E3E
  • 1E40
  • 1E42
  • 0143
    Ń
  • 0147
    Ň
  • 0145
    Ņ
  • 00D1
    Ñ
  • 1E44
  • 1E46
  • 01F8
    Ǹ
  • 1E48
  • 019D
    Ɲ
  • 014A
    Ŋ
  • 00D3
    Ó
  • 014E
    Ŏ
  • 00D4
    Ô
  • 00D6
    Ö
  • 00D2
    Ò
  • 0150
    Ő
  • 014C
    Ō
  • 00D5
    Õ
  • 01D1
    Ǒ
  • 020C
    Ȍ
  • 1ECC
  • 022E
    Ȯ
  • 01EA
    Ǫ
  • 00D8
    Ø
  • 01FE
    Ǿ
  • 0152
    Œ
  • 1E56
  • 00DE
    Þ
  • 0154
    Ŕ
  • 0158
    Ř
  • 0156
    Ŗ
  • 0210
    Ȑ
  • 1E5A
  • 1E5C
  • 1E5E
  • 015A
    Ś
  • 0160
    Š
  • 015C
    Ŝ
  • 015E
    Ş
  • 0218
    Ș
  • 1E60
  • 1E62
  • 00DF
    ß
  • 0166
    Ŧ
  • 0164
    Ť
  • 0162
    Ţ
  • 021A
    Ț
  • 1E6A
  • 1E6C
  • 00DA
    Ú
  • 016C
    Ŭ
  • 00DB
    Û
  • 00DC
    Ü
  • 0170
    Ű
  • 00D9
    Ù
  • 016A
    Ū
  • 0172
    Ų
  • 016E
    Ů
  • 0168
    Ũ
  • 01D3
    Ǔ
  • 0214
    Ȕ
  • 1EE4
  • 0244
    Ʉ
  • 1E7C
  • 1E82
  • 0174
    Ŵ
  • 1E84
  • 1E80
  • 00DD
    Ý
  • 0176
    Ŷ
  • 0178
    Ÿ
  • 1EF2
  • 0232
    Ȳ
  • 1EF8
  • 0179
    Ź
  • 017D
    Ž
  • 017B
    Ż
  • 1E92
Lowercase Accents (167 Glyphs)
  • 00E1
    á
  • 0103
    ă
  • 00E2
    â
  • 00E4
    ä
  • 00E0
    à
  • 0101
    ā
  • 0105
    ą
  • 00E5
    å
  • 00E3
    ã
  • 01FB
    ǻ
  • 01CE
    ǎ
  • 0201
    ȁ
  • 0227
    ȧ
  • 1EA1
  • 0203
    ȃ
  • 00E6
    æ
  • 01FD
    ǽ
  • 01E3
    ǣ
  • 1E03
  • 0107
    ć
  • 010D
    č
  • 00E7
    ç
  • 0109
    ĉ
  • 010B
    ċ
  • 010F
    ď
  • 1E11
  • 1E0B
  • 1E0D
  • 1E0F
  • 0111
    đ
  • 01C6
    dž
  • 00E9
    é
  • 0115
    ĕ
  • 011B
    ě
  • 00EA
    ê
  • 00EB
    ë
  • 0117
    ė
  • 00E8
    è
  • 0113
    ē
  • 1EBD
  • 0119
    ę
  • 0205
    ȅ
  • 1EB9
  • 0258
    ɘ
  • 0259
    ə
  • 01DD
    ǝ
  • 1E1F
  • 011F
    ğ
  • 011D
    ĝ
  • 0123
    ģ
  • 0121
    ġ
  • 01E7
    ǧ
  • 1E21
  • 0127
    ħ
  • 0125
    ĥ
  • 1E2B
  • 021F
    ȟ
  • 1E23
  • 1E25
  • 00ED
    í
  • 012D
    ĭ
  • 00EE
    î
  • 00EF
    ï
  • 00EC
    ì
  • 012B
    ī
  • 012F
    į
  • 0129
    ĩ
  • 0131
    ı
  • 01D0
    ǐ
  • 0209
    ȉ
  • 1ECB
  • 0268
    ɨ
  • 0133
    ij
  • 0135
    ĵ
  • 0237
    ȷ
  • 0137
    ķ
  • 01E9
    ǩ
  • 03BA
    κ
  • 013A
    ĺ
  • 013E
    ľ
  • 013C
    ļ
  • 0140
    ŀ
  • 1E37
  • 0142
    ł
  • 1E3F
    ḿ
  • 1E41
  • 1E43
  • 0144
    ń
  • 0148
    ň
  • 0149
    ʼn
  • 0146
    ņ
  • 00F1
    ñ
  • 1E45
  • 1E47
  • 01F9
    ǹ
  • 1E49
  • 0272
    ɲ
  • 014B
    ŋ
  • 00F3
    ó
  • 014F
    ŏ
  • 00F4
    ô
  • 00F6
    ö
  • 00F2
    ò
  • 0151
    ő
  • 014D
    ō
  • 00F5
    õ
  • 01D2
    ǒ
  • 020D
    ȍ
  • 1ECD
  • 022F
    ȯ
  • 01EB
    ǫ
  • 00F8
    ø
  • 01FF
    ǿ
  • 0153
    œ
  • 1E57
  • 00FE
    þ
  • 0155
    ŕ
  • 0159
    ř
  • 0157
    ŗ
  • 0211
    ȑ
  • 1E5B
  • 1E5D
  • 1E5F
  • 015B
    ś
  • 0161
    š
  • 015D
    ŝ
  • 015F
    ş
  • 0219
    ș
  • 1E61
  • 1E63
  • 00DF
    ß
  • 017F
    ſ
  • 0167
    ŧ
  • 0165
    ť
  • 0163
    ţ
  • 021B
    ț
  • 1E6B
  • 1E6D
  • 00FA
    ú
  • 016D
    ŭ
  • 00FB
    û
  • 00FC
    ü
  • 0171
    ű
  • 00F9
    ù
  • 016B
    ū
  • 0173
    ų
  • 016F
    ů
  • 0169
    ũ
  • 01D4
    ǔ
  • 0215
    ȕ
  • 1EE5
  • 0289
    ʉ
  • 1E7D
  • 1E83
  • 0175
    ŵ
  • 1E85
  • 1E81
  • 00FD
    ý
  • 0177
    ŷ
  • 00FF
    ÿ
  • 1EF3
  • 0233
    ȳ
  • 1EF9
  • 017A
    ź
  • 017E
    ž
  • 017C
    ż
  • 1E93
Lowercase Stylistic Set 01 (19 Glyphs)
  • 0061
    a
  • 00E1
    á
  • 0103
    ă
  • 00E2
    â
  • 00E4
    ä
  • 00E0
    à
  • 0101
    ā
  • 0105
    ą
  • 00E5
    å
  • 00E3
    ã
  • 01CE
    ǎ
  • 0201
    ȁ
  • 0203
    ȃ
  • 01FB
    ǻ
  • 0227
    ȧ
  • 1EA1
  • 00E6
    æ
  • 01FD
    ǽ
  • 01E3
    ǣ
Ligatures (11 Glyphs)
  • fb
  • ff
  • ffb
  • ffh
  • ffi
  • ffl
  • fi
  • fj
  • fk
  • fl
  • ij
Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Tabular Lining Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Case Sensitive Figures (10 Glyphs)
  • 0030
    0
  • 0031
    1
  • 0032
    2
  • 0033
    3
  • 0034
    4
  • 0035
    5
  • 0036
    6
  • 0037
    7
  • 0038
    8
  • 0039
    9
Math (9 Glyphs)
  • 002B
    +
  • 2212
  • 00D7
    ×
  • 00F7
    ÷
  • 003D
    =
  • 2260
  • 0023
    #
  • 0025
    %
  • 2030
Currency (9 Glyphs)
  • 00A4
    ¤
  • 00A2
    ¢
  • 20AC
  • 0024
    $
  • 00A3
    £
  • 20AA
  • 20BF
  • 20BD
  • 00A5
    ¥
Fraction (2 Glyphs)
  • 2044
  • 00BD
    ½
Punctuation (47 Glyphs)
  • 002E
    .
  • 002C
    ,
  • 003A
    :
  • 003B
    ;
  • 2025
  • 2026
  • 0021
    !
  • 203C
  • 003F
    ?
  • 00A1
    ¡
  • 00BF
    ¿
  • 002F
    /
  • 005C
    \
  • 005F
    _
  • 002D
    -
  • 00AD
    ­
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 00B7
    ·
  • 2022
  • 0028
    (
  • 0029
    )
  • 005B
    [
  • 005D
    ]
  • 007B
    {
  • 007D
    }
  • 27E8
  • 27E9
  • 27E6
  • 27E7
  • 00AB
    «
  • 00BB
    »
  • 2039
  • 203A
  • 0022
    "
  • 0027
    '
  • 2033
  • 2032
  • 201E
  • 201C
  • 201D
  • 201A
  • 2018
  • 2019
  • 002A
    *
  • 2051
  • 2042
Case Sensitive Punctuation (20 Glyphs)
  • 2033
  • 2032
  • 002D
    -
  • 00AD
    ­
  • 2013
  • 2014
  • 0028
    (
  • 0029
    )
  • 005B
    [
  • 005D
    ]
  • 007B
    {
  • 007D
    }
  • 27E8
  • 27E9
  • 27E6
  • 27E7
  • 00AB
    «
  • 00BB
    »
  • 2039
  • 203A
Arrows (18 Glyphs)
  • 27F5
  • 27F6
  • 2190
  • 2192
  • 2194
  • 2191
  • 2193
  • 2195
  • 2197
  • 2196
  • 2198
  • 2199
  • 21A9
  • 21B0
  • 21B1
  • 21B2
  • 21B3
  • 21C6
Case Sensitive Arrows (12 Glyphs)
  • 27F5
  • 27F6
  • 2191
  • 2197
  • 2192
  • 2198
  • 2193
  • 2199
  • 2190
  • 2196
  • 2194
  • 2195
Other (13 Glyphs)
  • 0040
    @
  • 0040
    @
  • 0026
    &
  • 00A7
    §
  • 2116
  • 00B0
    °
  • 2020
  • 2021
  • 00A9
    ©
  • 00AE
    ®
  • 00B6
  • 007C
    |
  • 00A6
    ¦
Atlantic

About

  • Number of glyphs: 1250
  • Number of weights: 7
  • Number of languages: 116
  • Available: desktop, web, social, app, epub
  • Designer: Jan Horcik
  • Date of release: 2021
  • Version: 4.023

Character Set

  • Basic Latin
  • Latin-1 Supplement
  • Latin Extended-A
  • Latin Extended-B
  • Combining Diacritical Marks
  • Latin Extended Additional
  • General Punctuation
  • Currency Symbols
  • Number Forms
  • Enclosed Alphanumerics
  • Dingbats

Features

  • Access All Alternates
  • Glyph Composition/Decomposition
  • Localized Forms
  • Subscript
  • Scientific Inferiors
  • Superscript
  • Numerator
  • Denominator
  • Fractions
  • Ordinals
  • Contextual Alternates
  • Lining Figures
  • Proportional Figures
  • Tabular Figures
  • Oldstyle Figures
  • Capitals to Small Caps
  • Small Caps
  • Case Sensitive Forms
  • Discretionary Ligatures
  • Slashed Zero
  • Capital Spacing
  • Stylistic Set 1
  • Stylistic Set 2
  • Stylistic Set 3
  • Stylistic Set 4
  • Stylistic Set 5

Languages

  • Afrikaans
  • Albanian
  • Asu
  • Basque
  • Bemba
  • Bena
  • Bosnian
  • Catalan
  • Cebuano
  • Chiga
  • Colognian
  • Cornish
  • Corsican
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • Embu
  • English
  • Estonian
  • Faroese
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Friulian
  • Galician
  • Ganda
  • German
  • Gusii
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Ido
  • Inari Sami
  • Indonesian
  • Interlingua
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • Javanese
  • Jju
  • Jola-Fonyi
  • Kabuverdianu
  • Kalaallisut
  • Kalenjin
  • Kamba
  • Kikuyu
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Kurdish
  • Latvian
  • Lithuanian
  • Lojban
  • Low German
  • Lower Sorbian
  • Luo
  • Luxembourgish
  • Luyia
  • Machame
  • Makhuwa-Meetto
  • Makonde
  • Malagasy
  • Malay
  • Maltese
  • Manx
  • Maori
  • Meru
  • Morisyen
  • North Ndebele
  • Northern Sami
  • Northern Sotho
  • Norwegian Bokmål
  • Norwegian Nynorsk
  • Nyanja
  • Nyankole
  • Occitan
  • Oromo
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Romanian
  • Romansh
  • Rombo
  • Rundi
  • Rwa
  • Samburu
  • Sango
  • Sangu
  • Sardinian
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Sena
  • Shambala
  • Shona
  • Slovak
  • Slovenian
  • Soga
  • Somali
  • South Ndebele
  • Southern Sotho
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Swati
  • Swedish
  • Swiss German
  • Taita
  • Taroko
  • Teso
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • Turkish
  • Turkmen
  • Upper Sorbian
  • Vunjo
  • Walloon
  • Walser
  • Welsh
  • Western Frisian
  • Wolof
  • Xhosa
  • Zulu
  • Afrikaans
  • Albanian
  • Asu
  • Basque
  • Bemba
  • Bena
  • Bosnian
  • Catalan
  • Cebuano
  • Chiga
  • Colognian
  • Cornish
  • Corsican
  • Croatian
  • Czech
  • Danish
  • Dutch
  • Embu
  • English
  • Estonian
  • Faroese
  • Filipino
  • Finnish
  • French
  • Friulian
  • Galician
  • Ganda
  • German
  • Gusii
  • Hungarian
  • Icelandic
  • Ido
  • Inari Sami
  • Indonesian
  • Interlingua
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • Javanese
  • Jju
  • Jola-Fonyi
  • Kabuverdianu
  • Kalaallisut
  • Kalenjin
  • Kamba
  • Kikuyu
  • Kinyarwanda
  • Kurdish
  • Latvian
  • Lithuanian
  • Lojban
  • Low German
  • Lower Sorbian
  • Luo
  • Luxembourgish
  • Luyia
  • Machame
  • Makhuwa-Meetto
  • Makonde
  • Malagasy
  • Malay
  • Maltese
  • Manx
  • Maori
  • Meru
  • Morisyen
  • North Ndebele
  • Northern Sami
  • Northern Sotho
  • Norwegian Bokmål
  • Norwegian Nynorsk
  • Nyanja
  • Nyankole
  • Occitan
  • Oromo
  • Polish
  • Portuguese
  • Romanian
  • Romansh
  • Rombo
  • Rundi
  • Rwa
  • Samburu
  • Sango
  • Sangu
  • Sardinian
  • Scottish Gaelic
  • Sena
  • Shambala
  • Shona
  • Slovak
  • Slovenian
  • Soga
  • Somali
  • South Ndebele
  • Southern Sotho
  • Spanish
  • Swahili
  • Swati
  • Swedish
  • Swiss German
  • Taita
  • Taroko
  • Teso
  • Tsonga
  • Tswana
  • Turkish
  • Turkmen
  • Upper Sorbian
  • Vunjo
  • Walloon
  • Walser
  • Welsh
  • Western Frisian
  • Wolof
  • Xhosa
  • Zulu

Buying options

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Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

Select license from the tabs

License Information

3rd Party Desktop

You will receive the license as a supplement to the Desktop License which allows you to share the font with your 3rd party companies, printers, freelancers or whoever else you need to edit something or work for you.

Broadcasting

You will receive the license to use the font within the television, cinema, video advertising, internet streaming, video clips & billboards, movie titling etc. The price is based on the location and the license duration.

Logos and Tag Lines

You will receive the license to use the font for your logos, taglines, branding slogans, catchphrases etc. This license allows to use the font even for animated versions of logos together with taglines etc.

Online Advertising

You will receive the license to use the font for your advertisement on website or mobile platforms, pop-ups and banners, html5 banners, hover ads, floating ads, email newsletters, digital signages, video advertising etc.

Merchandising

You will receive the license to use the font on the physical products for commercial or advertising merchandise such as for instance product packaging, clothing & shoes, sport accessories, objects made of letters etc.

Enterprise

You will receive the unlimited license for absolute adaptability. Package includes Desktop, Web, App, Social Media, ePub, 3rd Party Desktop, Broadcasting, Logo and Tag Lines, Online Advertising, Merchandising licenses.

Student

We offer the 50% discount for students for their non-commercial and commercial projects during their studies. To get the discount, please hit the button “Get in Touch”. Please do not forget to attach a certificate of study.

Nonprofit Organization

We also support educational programmes and non-profit organisations with the same 50% discount. To get the discount, please hit the button “Get in Touch” Please do not forget to attach a certificate of your non-profit organization.